There are people who know it even though they don’t want to admit it … but they procrastinate their time. In fact, about 50% of people consider themselves moderate when it comes to procrastinating . About 20% of people see themselves as chronic procastrinators, which means they procrastinate in many different areas of their lives: work, relationships, the economy, health … you name it. Does it sound familiar to you?

Procrastination could be a time management issue, but it’s often about avoiding certain emotions. You could put off if the task in question seems boring or useless … but if it seemed motivating, maybe things would change. It may also be that you are so afraid of not doing a good job that you feel so paralyzed that you can’t even start …

1. If you don’t, it affects you too

Most procrastinators focus on short-term benefits rather than long-term benefits. For example, they are left thinking, “It’s going to be difficult, I don’t know how to do it, it’s going to be uncomfortable, ” instead of just doing it. Here’s the funny part: “Even though you are procrastinating and trying to avoid any unpleasant experience you think you’re going to have, by avoiding it you still have that unfinished business, so you still have a negative impact on you, even if it isn’t. doing.

Procrastination is not a psychiatric diagnosis, but it can lead to stress levels, health problems, and poor performance at school and work. It can affect you emotionally, physically, in regards to relationships, and obviously at work . The good news is that it is possible to overcome your procrastinating habits. Everything that is learned can be unlearned. If you want to stop being a procrastinator, now is the time to make the change.

2. Forgive yourself

Why should you forgive yourself if you have done nothing wrong? Yes, you must forgive yourself for the delay in time that you have made in the past. But today everything changes. You don’t have to think anymore that you can’t do things because you are a lazy person. Labeling yourself lazy will only make you more likely to procrastinate … But you can move on.

But how can you forgive yourself? Think about what you did in the past and ask if you could improve next time. Instead of focusing on the guilt and shame you feel, free your mind to focus on solving problems and getting more done.

3. Think about why you are delaying (really)

You have to ask yourself why you are procrastinating and being honest with yourself … is it fear of failure? Fear of success ? Do you think you will not be able to do it? You have to find out the root of the problem and take steps to do your best or ask for help if you need it. Perhaps if you better understand what is happening you will be able to do things better without delaying time.

4. The two minute rule

This rule will change your life. Here’s how it works: If a task will take less than two minutes, do it immediately. Completing simple tasks right away keeps you on a productive path and can also help you avoid feeling stuck on your to-do list.

5. Reframe tasks

Whether or not to be productive depends on two things: whether you are able to complete the task and whether you think the task is worth it. Set yourself up for success by focusing on the reasons you are doing the task in the first place, rather than repeating all the possible downsides in your head. At work, for example, that could mean viewing a complex project as something that can help you develop a good skill set or earn extra money at the end of the month.

Organize your life and the delay of time will be a thing of the past!

Elle Mcdonald

I am Elle Mcdonald Specializations in Psychology . Graduated in psychology from the University of Tennessee in 2000. Diploma of Advanced Studies in the Department of Personality, Evaluation and psychological treatments with excellent results.

First Level of Master in Clinical Psychology at the Center for Behavioral Therapists (recognized with a scientific-professional nature by the College of Psychologists)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.